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How to Manage Diabetes

Eating for Diabetes Control

Understanding Carbohydrates, Fats, and Protein - VHL HealthSheet #89505_VA
Having diabetes doesn’t mean you have to eat special foods or give up desserts. Instead, your dietitian can show you how to plan meals to suit your body.
Understanding Carbohydrates - VHL HealthSheet #82120_VA
Carbohydrates are your body’s main source of glucose, a special kind of sugar. Your dietitian will probably recommend that 55 to 60 percent of your calories come from carbohydrates. There are two types of carbohydrates: complex and simple.
Diabetes: Shopping for and Preparing Meals - VHL HealthSheet #82132_VA
Choose carefully and cook wisely. As you shop, think about how the foods you choose will fit into your meal plan. When you cook, try to cut down on sugar and fat. If you have high blood pressure, cut down on salt as well.
Diabetes: Learning About Serving and Portion Sizes - VHL HealthSheet #89499_VA
Learning to measure serving sizes can help you figure out how many carbohydrates (“carbs”) and other foods you eat each day. They are also powerful tools for managing your weight.
Diabetes: Meal Planning - VHL HealthSheet #89501_VA
You can help keep your blood sugar level in your target range by eating healthy foods. Your healthcare team can help you create a low-fat, nutritious meal plan.
Healthy Meals for Diabetes - VHL HealthSheet #82118_VA
Your meal plan tells you when to eat your meals and snacks, what kinds of foods to eat, and how much of each food to eat. You don’t have to give up all the foods you like. But you do need to follow some guidelines.
Eating Out When You Have Diabetes - VHL HealthSheet #82122_VA
Eating right is an important step in keeping your blood glucose in balance. You can eat out and be healthy—you just need to be aware of what you order. This meal plan will give you plenty of healthy foods to choose from.
Diabetes and Drinking Alcohol - VHL HealthSheet #40480_VA
If you have diabetes, be careful with alcohol. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar (glucose) level. It can also increase health risks.
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